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nmlstudent's picture

Trust media truth

by Isabelle Abraham
As more phone-hacking incidents come to light, the UK media is bearing the brunt of the mounting number of lawsuits. News24 reported that as of 20 April, the cases brought against News of the World has now amounted to a staggering 100. Another UK organisation, British broadcaster Sky News, has admitted to hacking emails, but justifies this decision as ‘public interest’. Sky News is a part of BSkyB – of which 39% is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation.

Guy Berger's picture

The silliness (and illness!) of policy silos in South Africa

South Africa is missing a trick or ten, thanks to our silo policy approach to broadcast and broadband.

You may have thought these two realms, which share the character of being "broad" - and more importantly, will share a digital character sooner rather than later, were a natural for convergent treatment.

Guy Berger's picture

Making Internet accessible

Everyone knows there's an issue in access to the Internet in much of the developing world. BUT:

* Are we talking about access for adults, or also for teens and children?
* Are we talking about access at home, work or anywhere? What diffs does it make?
* Is it access at any time - or does once a month access mean a person counts as an "Internet user"?
* Is it access on any screen? Are cellphone screens good enough for meaningful access?
* Do we count "shaped" use as access - eg. Blackberry packages @ R2 a day are fantastic, but no downloads allowed.

Guy Berger's picture

Old standards, new challenges: free speech and the Internet

After consultations in Sweden, Cairo, Delhi, Johannesburg, Buenos Aires and Bangkok, the UN special rapporteur for free expression is wrapping up a recommended position for the UN Human Rights Council. Frank la Rue is now reporting back to an "experts meeting" in Stockholm, ahead of concluding his report.

There are lots of hot topics about freedom on the Internet, and restrictions... including blocking, filtering, access, intellectual property, legislation, international co-operation, the responsibilities of Internet Service Providers, etc.

nmlstudent's picture

Wiki-wiki wow remix

“Copyright laws are turning kids into criminals”.

This claim is made by Lawrence Lessig, a Stanford law professor and an advocate of Creative Commons.

His argument is simple: Generation-Y is not going to change, so the laws will have to:

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