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Sean Black's picture

Down the rabbit hole of violence

So for my final blog about broadcast I thought it would be interesting to look at the history of broadcast standards, and how they have affected the broadcast medium as a whole, and, in particular, journalism.

Sean Black's picture

Parental guidance is advised

Humans are obsessed with violence. It seems to be ingrained in our subconscious nature – in our very DNA. How often have you heard a car’s hooter screech and you whip your head around expecting (or hoping) to see a crash? More than I care to admit, I can tell you that.
Michelle Avenant's picture

#NotAllMen, #YesAllWomen: Let's keep talking.

The Isla Vista Killing is not the first incident of misogynistic mass murder in the US – but it is the first to stir up a social media storm of this magnitude.

For those of you who are still out of the loop: on Friday night (23 May), 22-year-old UCSB student Elliot Rodger killed six people and injured thirteen before turning the gun on himself.

staff's picture

Questioning convergence

Larry Strelitz recently spoke to Reg Rumney, Head of the Centre for Economics Journalism in Africa at Rhodes University, about current trends in media convergence. They explored what is meant by the term ‘convergence’ as well as the underlying cultural, technological and economic drivers of the process. Rumney provided examples of the process in practice and also raised concerns that the need to train future journalists in the varied technologies of production may be diverting attention away from the importance of actual content.

Robert's picture

Why Xolela Mangcu is wrong to call the media a Zuma lynch mob

A favourite tactic of media critics is to use anecdotal evidence to tar the whole profession. In his Business Day column this week, Xolela Mngcu goes one better. He convicts the media of “cowboy justice” in its coverage of Jacob Zuma’s legal travails, without providing one shred of evidence in support.

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