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press freedom day

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Guy Berger's picture

Taking stock of press freedom progress

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Journalists like to see journalists as heroes. That’s excluding their peers in state-owned media in Africa who are more usually propagandists rather than journalists.
On the other side of the fence, governments typically like to see journalists as villains, while civil society – sitting on the fence – sees them as flawed heroes, tainted by commercial considerations.
Audiences are more sanguine. They see some journalists as angels, some as devils.

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