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Social TV brings T-Commerce and Open Journalism

by Simone Redelinghuys
Television broadcast is far from dead, it is simply adapting and transforming. The new broadcast landscape is not just about check-ins, real-time tweets, catch up TV or instant connectivity. While television and social networks form stronger bonds and increased interactivity; researchers and media practitioners emphasise that this is not the only change social TV will bring.

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Tweeting in a time of radical change

Educators need to refresh Journalism, Media and Communication Studies curricula to help make sense of a radically changing mediascape. This was the message to delegates from UNESCO's Centres of Journalism Excellence and Reference who attended a programme titled Capacitating COE's for Real-Time Journalism and Media Studies just ahead of the second World Journalism Educators' Congress.

New Media Lab lecturer, Jude Mathurine shared lessons from Rhodes' School of Journalism and Media Studies' own change to a converged curriculum. He called on delegates to consider three key ideas:

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Compulsion, convergence and cash in the Boston Globe newsroom

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My pal, the new media revolutionary Rosental Alves, (pictured left) invited me to join him on a visit to the newsroom of the troubled Boston Globe on 7 August, and the top two people showed us around – Marty Baron, the editor (pictured right), and David Beard who edits Boston.Com.

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Old controls in an era of new media

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Laura Pinto has named her website for the temperature at which paper burns.

There's a bit of schizophrenia here at the Deutsche Welle conference in Bonn, in a session that's dealing with journalism education. On the one hand is my experience of Twitter and Qik, and on the other I’m giving a presentation about old-style attempts to regulate journalism education (and journalism) in Kenya and Tanzania.

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Social media, journalism and journalism education

Journalism lecturers at Rhodes University are finding ways to use social media such as Facebook and Twitter in their teaching.
Radio lecturer Danika Marquis said students use social to research trends in popular culture, and to advertise their work, including personal bogs and radio journalism or podcasts.

"It is a good way of attracting traffic to student work," Marquis said.

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