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Tweeting in a time of radical change

Educators need to refresh Journalism, Media and Communication Studies curricula to help make sense of a radically changing mediascape. This was the message to delegates from UNESCO's Centres of Journalism Excellence and Reference who attended a programme titled Capacitating COE's for Real-Time Journalism and Media Studies just ahead of the second World Journalism Educators' Congress.

New Media Lab lecturer, Jude Mathurine shared lessons from Rhodes' School of Journalism and Media Studies' own change to a converged curriculum. He called on delegates to consider three key ideas:

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It’s tough to teach journalism in Iraq

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Peter Laufer plays radio-host in a fun-workshop that tapped the views of Iraqi journalism teachers.

Imagine journalism classes in temperatures of 45 degrees celsius. That’s the experience of in Baghdad where power failures cripple classroom fans.

In March this year, the campus radio station at the University of Baghdad stopped broadcasting because a sand-storm demolished the transmission tower.

These, though, are the least of the problems.

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UNESCO and NML strengthen journalism education in Africa

A partnership between UNESCO and the Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies will put the spotlight on strengthening African journalism education in September 2009.

The joint activities planned over a week-long period are:
- A special training programme to empower African journalism teachers in using New Media, to be run by Rhodes expert lecturer Jude Mathurine.
- The participants will also join a research colloquium as part of the African preparations for the World Journalism Education Congress set down for Rhodes University in July 2010.

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Old controls in an era of new media

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Laura Pinto has named her website for the temperature at which paper burns.

There's a bit of schizophrenia here at the Deutsche Welle conference in Bonn, in a session that's dealing with journalism education. On the one hand is my experience of Twitter and Qik, and on the other I’m giving a presentation about old-style attempts to regulate journalism education (and journalism) in Kenya and Tanzania.

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